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Beyond the Basics Conway AR

Here in this section of articles you'll find information helpful to those who have the knitting basics down and are looking for something a little more advanced. Learn some new techniques and tricks that you can test out on your next project.
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Beyond the Basics: Selvages Conway AR

The selvage (or selvedge) of knit fabric is an edge formed by changing the stitch pattern at the beginning and end of every row. This stabilizes the fabric and prepares it for seaming or creates a finished edge on pieces that will have no further finishing.

Beyond the Basics: Crochet Edges Conway AR

Crochet edges are a great option for finishing knit garments as they add stability and flatten curling pieces. Easy to make, they can easily be redone until you achieve the desired effect, so feel free to experiment.

Beyond the Basics: Bands Conway AR

Beyond the Basics

Beyond the Basics: Decreases K2TOG Conway AR

Do you want to learn how to do a basic decrease when knitting? This article will help you through the process step-by-step with illustrations to help you see what everything should look like as you're doing it. So read on and get started!

Beyond the Basics: Decreases K2TOG TBL Conway AR

This article will show you how to do a basic single left-slanting decrease. Just follow the step-by-step instructions and accompanying illustrations below, and you'll be able to do deacreases on your own in no time at all.

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Beyond the Basics: Bands Conway AR

Beyond the Basics

Beyond the Basics: Bobbles Conway AR

A bobble is a three-dimensional stitch made by working multiple increases in one stitch, sometimes working a few rows, and then decreasing back to one stitch. It is abbreviated MB (make bobble).

Beyond the Basics: Buttonholes Conway AR

When making buttonholes, remember that when you bind off stitches, you must offset them by casting on (usually on the next row). Yarn overs must be offset by decreases. You usually work the first row of a buttonhole on the right side of the piece unless otherwise stated.

Beyond the Basics: Buttons Conway AR

Buttons can add a striking contrast to your garment, or they can blend in subtly with the knit fabric. You can also make perfectly matching crochet buttons, which are shown here. Read on to find out more about adding buttons to any project you're working on.

Beyond the Basics: Cables Conway AR

A cable (also called a cross) is formed by using an extra needle, usually a cable needle or double-pointed needle, to hold stitches to be crossed either to the front (which crosses them to the left), or to the back (which crosses them to the right).

Beyond the Basics: Circular Needles Conway AR

Circular needles are available in several lengths. The length that you use will depend on the number of stitches you will be working with and the stitch gauge. The needle should be short enough so that the stitches are not stretched when joined.

Beyond the Basics: Cords Conway AR

Cords make great creative extras for your knitted pieces. You can weave or lace them into eyelets, lace stitches, loosely knit areas or dropped-stitch spaces. For a unique embellishment, shape a cord into any design you like and sew it onto the surface of your project.

Beyond the Basics: Crochet Edges Conway AR

Crochet edges are a great option for finishing knit garments as they add stability and flatten curling pieces. Easy to make, they can easily be redone until you achieve the desired effect, so feel free to experiment.

Beyond the Basics: Decreases Conway AR

Most decreases are worked on the right side of the knitting, but sometimes it is necessary to decrease stitches on the wrong side (such as when the decreases are worked on every row). For this reason, we have also included decreases that can be worked on the purl side of the work.

Beyond the Basics: Decreases K2TOG Conway AR

Do you want to learn how to do a basic decrease when knitting? This article will help you through the process step-by-step with illustrations to help you see what everything should look like as you're doing it. So read on and get started!

Beyond the Basics: Decreases K2TOG TBL Conway AR

This article will show you how to do a basic single left-slanting decrease. Just follow the step-by-step instructions and accompanying illustrations below, and you'll be able to do deacreases on your own in no time at all.

Beyond the Basics: Double-Pointed Needles (DPNs) Conway AR

Unlike circular needles, double-pointed needles are used only for tubular pieces. Actually, the very first circular knitting was done on double-pointed needles. Since the invention of circular needles, double-pointed needles are used less often, usually to knit small items such as mittens, gloves, socks hats and sleeve cuffs.

Beyond the Basics: Embroidery Conway AR

Many types of yarn can be used for embroidery, but you should select one that is smooth enough to go through the knitted fabric. Make sure that the weight and content of the yarn is appropriate for the knit piece. Yarns that are too thin will sink into the fabric, and a too-thick yarn will stretch out the piece.

Beyond the Basics: Fair Isle Knitting Conway AR

Traditionally, Fair Isle knitting was defined as knitting with many colors, but never using more than two in any one row. Most patterns were made up of small motifs that repeated across the piece. Knitters today use myriad colors in their Fair Isle patterns, and the term now refers to any color knitting where color changes are frequent, requiring the yarns to be carried across the wrong side of the work.

Beyond the Basics: Fringe Conway AR

Your knitted project can be a base for adding a wide variety of creative extras, such as fringe. Perfect on scarves, afghans, sweaters and more, fringe can be made in several styles and from different materials to add an element of fun to your knitting.

Beyond the Basics: Grafting Conway AR

Grafting, also called weaving or kitchener stitch, joins two open edges stitch by stitch using a yarn needle. When grafting garter stitch, it is important that the purl stitches of the front piece face the knit stitches of the back piece.

Beyond the Basics: Hems Conway AR

A hem or facing is an edge that folds under to keep the knitting from curling or stretching. A hem can be used to form a casing for elastic, such as at the top of a skirt. It can be worked at the same time as the piece or picked up after it is complete.

Beyond the Basics: Horizontal Stripes Conway AR

If the pattern calls for odd-numbered stripes, you will have to cut the yarn and rejoin it on the opposite side. To avoid this, you can change the pattern to make an even number of rows in each stripe. You can also work the piece back and forth on a circular needle.

Beyond the Basics: Increases Bar Increase Conway AR

To knit into the front loop, insert the right needle from left to right into the stitch on the left needle. To knit into the back loop (loop farthest from you), insert right needle from right to left under left needle and into stitch.

Beyond the Basics: Increases Make One Increase Conway AR

Do you need some help making one increase in your knitting project? The step-by-step article below will guide you through the process using detailed descriptions and helpful illustrations so you can do it right the first time.

Beyond the Basics: Intarsia Conway AR

Intarsia knitting should not be worked circularly because at the end of the round, the yarns would be in the wrong position. You would have to cut all the yarn and reattach it, leaving you to weave in hundreds of ends.

Beyond the Basics: Knitting With Beads Conway AR

Most beads are made from glass, wood, plastic, clay and papier-mâché, but they can also be made from pearls, gems, buttons and some stones. Match your beads to the yarn by using luxurious beads on silks and other shiny yarns for evening wear and rougher beads on tweeds and wools for day wear.

Beyond the Basics: Knitting With Sequins Conway AR

Adding sequins is a glamorous way to embellish simple sweaters. Sequins come with holes at the top or in the center. The hole placement determines how the sequin will lie, which will affect the finished look of your sweater.

Beyond the Basics: Picking Up Stitches Conway AR

The neatest way to pick up stitches is to do it from the right side of the work. It is also important to actually make knit stitches on a knitting needle with a separate strand of yarn rather than picking up a strand from the edge of the piece itself, which will stretch and distort the edge.

Beyond the Basics: Pockets Conway AR

If you want to add pockets to a garment, you will need to decide what type of pocket and edging, where to place the pocket, and whether it should contrast or match your sweater's yarn and pattern.

Beyond the Basics: Pompoms Conway AR

You can use pompoms as a decorative trim, at the ends of cords on hats or hoods and for children's garments. They are easy to make. Read on to learn the steps.

Beyond the Basics: Seaming Conway AR

It is best to use your knitting yarn to sew the pieces together, unless you have used a novelty or untwisted, roving yarn. In that case, sew the seams with a flat, firm yarn in a compatible color. Be sure that it has the same washability as your knitting yarn.

Beyond the Basics: Selvages Conway AR

The selvage (or selvedge) of knit fabric is an edge formed by changing the stitch pattern at the beginning and end of every row. This stabilizes the fabric and prepares it for seaming or creates a finished edge on pieces that will have no further finishing.

Beyond the Basics: Short Row Shaping Conway AR

Shaping with short rows eliminates the jagged edges that occur when you bind off a series of stitches such as at shoulders or on collars. After working short rows at a shoulder, bind off all the stitches at one time or join them to another piece directly from the needles.

Beyond the Basics: Slipping a Stitch Conway AR

A stitch slipped purlwise remains untwisted, but slipped knitwise, it will twist. If instructions do not specify which way to slip the stitch, slip it purlwise except when decreasing; in this case, slip knit stitches knitwise and purl stitches purlwise.

Beyond the Basics: Sock Basics Conway AR

While most socks these days are knit from patterns that may feature any number of design elements and variations in techniques, certain aspects of their construction remain consistent. The following information describes the basic components of socks and offers some notes on how they are made.

Beyond the Basics: Tassels Conway AR

Tassels are simple to make and can be used in many creative ways. You can use tassels as a decorative trim, at the ends of cords, on hats or hoods and for children's garments.

Beyond the Basics: Vertical Stripes Conway AR

If you want the stripes to start at the beginning of the piece, cast on with only one color, then start the stripes on the first row. Or you can cast on using the colors in the stripes, as shown below.

Beyond the Basics: Zippers Conway AR

Several types of zippers can be added to knit garments. Zippers should be sewn in by hand rather than by machine. The opening should be the same length as the zipper so that the seam doesn't stretch or pucker.